Municipal

Loraas Environmental Services Ltd. COVID-19 Response -Waste Management Guidance for Residents and Businesses

LES-COVID-19-Guideance-Waste-Management-for-Residents-and-Businesses-March-23-20

Loraas Environmental Services Ltd. (“Loraas”) has developed safe waste disposal guidelines for our residential and business customers in the North Battleford and Kindersley areas due to the COVID-19 (“coronavirus”) beginning March 23, 2020 until further notice.
Loraas wishes to emphasize that these guidelines are being put in place as a precautionary measure to protect the health and safety of collectors who handle thousands of receptacles a week and physically sort recyclable materials. Proper disposal of potentially contaminated items is also a good safeguard to have in place to protect the general public.
Guidelines for safe waste disposal during global COVID-19 pandemic include:

  1. If you are sick, please place ANY item that have come into contact with your mouth, nose, eyes, or hands in a bag and into the garbage – even items that you normally place into your Blue Cart or Bin (i.e.
    water/beverage bottles, yogurt containers, milk/juice cartons, etc.)
  2. Bag all garbage securely and place it into your black/waste cart. Do not place garbage loosely in your carts.
  3. Recyclable items should be placed loosely into your blue/recycling cart; excluding potentially contaminated recyclables mentioned above. Ensure recyclables are cleaned and not food-soiled.
  4. Ensure accessible cart placement (4ft between carts or obstacles) to avoid manual handling by our collectors.
  5. Cart lids must be fully closed to prevent windblown items. Items placed outside of the carts will not be collected.
  6. Used tissues and disposable clean products (i.e. wipes), should be placed into a bag then into your black/garbage cart only.
  7. Cleaning products and aerosols with warning labels should not be placed into your recycling cart. Please hold onto these items and use a Household Hazard Collection Day program if available in your community.

For excess garbage, recycling, or organic waste, The Loraas Transfer Station in Battleford, SK will remain open to the public. For details and hours visit:
http://loraasenviro.ca/. Loraas’ offices will be closed to the public, but our representatives are still able to assist you. Please call (306) 445-3900 for questions or concerns.

Office Closure

CLOSED

Jan. 28-Feb.3, 2020

For holidays

OPEN

Feb. 4 ,6-7, 2020

Regular office hours

IF YOU REQUIRE IMMEDIATE ASSISTANCE

PLEASE CALL Jason @ 831-8881

SORRY FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE

For Highway 31 overweight permits call 882-4030.

Fire Risk Warning – Be Prepared!

 

 

Hunting season is upon us!

Due to extremely dry conditions throughout the province, fire risk increases. Hunters are reminded to take extra precautions during hunting season:

Carry a fire extinguisher in your vehicle.
Talk to landowners before going on their land.
Avoid unnecessary vehicle idling.
Walk whenever possible.
Stay on existing trails.

Approximately 50 per cent of all wildfires are caused by people.

Keep your vehicle out of tall grass – stick to roads and trails. Mufflers and other parts can get hot enough to start a fire.
When setting up your camp, pick an area free of tall grass.
Seek landowner permission before accessing private lands, whether they are posted or not.
Be prepared, carry a fire extinguisher, shovel, or other tools.

LEARN MORE AT saskatchewan.ca/hunting

 

Restricted Office Hours – August 31-Sept 1, 2017

We will be in and out of the office the week of Aug. 31 – Sept. 1/17. Please call ahead to make sure we are in the office if you want to come and pay your taxes.
Thank you.

Rachel Deobald, RMA
Administrator

R.M. Of Mountain View No. 318
Ph: (306)377-2144
Fax:(306)377-2023
e-mail: rm318@sasktel.net

Survey of insect populations in fields throughout the province

FROM AGRICULTURE  and AGRIFOOD CANADA

 

Insect Pest Surveys in Crops in 2017

Each year, entomologists from AAFC Research Centres collaborate with extension agrologists, crop specialists and industry groups to conduct insect pest surveys in field crops throughout the prairie region.   I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you for your tremendous support of the provincial insect monitoring programs in the past and we hope that you will be equally supportive in 2017.

Pest surveys furnish valuable information as to what insect pest species are present at different times of the year, and also provide an estimate of their density within different crops.  Producers, provincial agricultural representatives and industry groups are provided with advance warning of potential pest problems through well-run insect pest monitoring programs.  From a research perspective, survey results help to guide our research efforts on integrated insect pest management.

In 2017, our plans are to conduct organized surveys of a number of different insect pests. In most cases, the protocols require survey locations to be selected at random, making it very difficult to predict exactly where and when surveyors will be in a specific area.  Most of the survey protocols require that the surveyor enters selected fields to visually inspect plants or to take sweep samples with a standard insect net.  Other protocols may require that the surveyor enters selected fields to take random plant or soil samples.  Our surveyors will be driving vehicles clearly marked with the Government of Canada logo and will be carrying photo-ID cards.  We do not trespass on lands that are posted or have been restricted by owners and do not drive onto fields, only entering on foot.  Surveyors wear disposable booties that are changed after each survey stop. If, during the surveys, you wish to obtain further clarification or wish to be provided with a report on the insect pests found at specific sites, our field staff would be more than pleased to discuss the results of their finding with you or please feel free to contact me at the address above.

Survey protocols along with weekly updates from the Prairie Pest Monitoring Network are posted on the PPMN blog http://prairiepestmonitoring.blogspot.ca/.  Automatic emails of the weekly update can be received by subscribing to the blog.  Survey protocols and weekly updates are also available on the WFPM website: http://www.westernforum.org/IPMNProtocols.html .

In order to give you a sense of the insect monitoring activities planned for 2017, we have provided brief examples of what to expect from some of the different surveys:

 

Cabbage seedpod weevil in canola.  This pest was first discovered in southwest Saskatchewan in 2000.  The objective is to determine the extent to which this pest has spread from the original infestation area in southern Alberta. Field staff will be surveying much of the province, during the flowering stage and will be taking sweep samples in canola fields.

 

Leafhoppers in canola. This pest carries the plant disease called Aster Yellows, a disease that has become more common in canola in recent years.  The objective is to determine the extent and severity of leafhopper populations and their level of infectivity.  Field staff will be surveying, primarily in the central and northern agricultural areas, prior to the flowering stage and will be taking sweep samples in canola fields.

 

Bertha armyworm and Diamondback moth in canola. Advance warning of these two pests are provided by the pheromone traps that have been set out by cooperators across the province to monitor the arrival of adults in canola.  Once adult female moths have laid eggs in canola, the objective is to determine the extent and severity of larval populations in the crop. In this instance, field staff will be surveying during the flowering and pod development stage and will be visually counting larvae in the field.

 

Wheat midge in wheat.  There are two life stages of the wheat midge that are monitored, the adult and the larval cocoon.  The objective of the adult survey is to assess population density in the crop during the susceptible period, from head emergence to flowering.  Field staff may be surveying in many regions of the province, during late June and early July, and will be entering fields late in the evenings to visually inspect wheat plants.  The objective of the larval cocoon survey is to determine the extent and severity of midge populations in wheat. Field staff will be surveying in late fall throughout the province and will be entering fields after harvest to take small soil cores.

 

Grasshoppers in field crops and pastures.  The objective of the adult grasshopper survey is to determine the extent and severity of grasshopper populations in field crops and pastures.  Field staff will be surveying in early fall and will be entering ditches, fields and pastures to visually estimate grasshopper numbers over an 100m transect.

 

Pea Leaf Weevil. Recently, pea leaf weevil has begun to cause economic yield losses to field peas in Alberta, and it has been also been recorded in southwest Saskatchewan.  This small weevil notches field pea leaves, decreasing production. Plans are to sweep pea fields in June and July to verify its status.

 

Swede midge & Cereal Leaf Beetle.  Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) announced that adult Swede midge, confirmed in Saskatchewan in 2007, was recorded again in 2009.  Swede midge is native to Europe and Asia, is a pest of plants in the Cruciferae family including vegetable crops (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower) and oilseed crops (canola).  Also a new record for Saskatchewan, CFIA announced that Cereal leaf beetle, a pest of cereal crops, was found in 2008.

FROM:

Owen Olfert, Research Scientist

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Saskatoon Research Centre

107 Science Place Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X2

(306) 385-9355

owen.olfert@agr.gc.ca

insect populations in fields throughout the province 2017 monitoring _letter

Map overview 2017

Municipal Maps

You can view high resolution maps of the RM and the Hamlets of Herschel and Stranraer here.

[lsvr_separator margin_bottom=”large”]

RM318

Herschel

Stranraer

[lsvr_separator]